27th sept Imran Khan speech in UNGA

Prime Minister Imran Khan, in his maiden speech at the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) on Friday, said Pakistan would fight till the end if India imposed a war in case of any Pulwama-like situation in Indian Occupied Kashmir (IOK).

“If a conventional war starts between the two countries, anything could happen. But supposing a country seven times smaller than its neighbour is faced with the choice: either you surrender, or you fight for your freedom till death?” he said.




“What will we do? I ask myself these questions. We will fight… and when a nuclear-armed country fights to the end, it will have consequences far beyond the borders.”
He said there will be bloodbath once curfew is lifted in IOK.

“There are 900,000 troops there, they haven’t come to, as Narendra Modi says — for the prosperity of Kashmir… These 900,000 troops, what are they going to do? When they come out? There will be a bloodbath,” he said.

The IOK is under lockdown for over 50 days following New Delhi’s illegal move of revoking its special status on August 5.

The Indian government has deployed ten of thousands of additional troops in addition to already 800,000-strong contingent, imposed severe restrictions including curfew and communication blockade.

Thousands of people have been detained and political leaders are placed under house arrest.

PM Imran asked the United Nations to act before it’s too late.

“This is not a time to appease but a time to action. India must lift curfew, free all political prisoners, and the world community must give Kashmiris the right to self-determination,” the premier said.

He rejected India’s claims of militant organisations operating in Pakistan.

I invite UN to visit Pakistan see for themselves the steps we have taken to counter terrorism, he said, adding that Pakistan reached out to India several times but to no avail.

“[Narendra Modi’s] hidden agenda came to fore on August 5, when New Delhi revoked special status of occupied Kashmir and locked 80 million Kashmiris in curfew.”

He said Indian actions in IOK were pushing people to pick guns. “When you’re imprisoning 8 million people, you are forcing them to pick arms,” he said.

Climate change

At the beginning of his speech, the prime minister touched upon the issue of climate change, saying that reckless attitude of world leaders, especially those of the developed countries, was the main hurdle in tackling the issue.

He said around 80 per cent of Pakistan and India’s water came from the glaciers, which, he added, were melting at a fast pace due to rising temperatures.

He demanded of the world community to push the developed countries, which are major contributors to greenhouse gas emissions, to take cognisance of the matter which is having “devastating consequences for human beings”.

Money laundering

Speaking on the issue of money laundering, PM Imran took the developed world to task for ‘exploiting’ wealth of under-developed countries through “legal loopholes” in their system.

“Every year billions of dollars leave poor countries and end up in the foreign accounts in the western world, widening the gap between the rich and the poor, and giving rise to poverty and deaths,” he said.

“In order to stop the economic migration, it is imperative for the world to act against the money laundering.”

Islamophobia

The premier explained the reasons of the rise of Islamophobia in the world.

He said hatred against Muslims rose when some western leaders equated Islam with terrorism.

People living in the western world, he said, have a different point of view about the religion than people living in Muslim countries.

“Certain sections in the western world deliberately published books against Islam causing fury in the Muslim countries and Muslims were portrayed as intolerant and extremist,” he said.

The false perception, he added, was created due to the inability of Muslim leaders to explain the sanctity of religion and Holy Prophet (PBUH) for the Muslims.

He said there was nothing like radical or extremist Islam, lashing out at leaders for using the term “radical Islam”.

“How a person living in the western country would distinguish between radical Islam and modern Islam,” he said, and added that in all religions there were extremists but no religion taught such ideals.